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QATSPY- The Tenth Tee Playing Partners

The QATSPY GOLF Inside the Leather Sports Page

Homer Qatspy Boatright the Qatspy Diaries  

Inside the leather Classic Golf Swing Mechanics and simple golf swing tips for self-coaching techniques.

 

By: Charles W. Boatright

Author of The ESPY Golf Swing Coach, Delta Technique Geared for Distance and Control

 

Rendezvous with Destiny, Operation Copra

 

Stories from a Golfer’s Diary

 

By the time the Gaston and Qatspy got to the ninth hole, Gaston and Qatspy had a small crowd following them. At the turn, Gaston had a 37, and Qatspy had a score of 34. Gaston and Qatspy made the turn and waited while two French officers with the Army at the tenth tee cleared the box. The two officers waved up Gaston and Qatspy to the tenth tee box. The two officers were aware of the work that Gaston and Qatspy were engaged in on the Hydro project. As Gaston and Qatspy approached the officers with the Colonel insignia, in broken English, asked Gaston and Qatspy to join them to finish out the round. Gaston and Qatspy, seeking local knowledge of the course, gladly accepted.

 

 

The Colonel, speaking in a heavy French-English accent, introduced themselves as Colonel Jacques Pierre Bellamy and Lieutenant Colonel Benoît Quentrell.” After the two officers stated their names, Gaston and Qatspy introduced themselves to the two officers. Colonel Bellamy, in a humble voice, explained to Gaston and Qatspy, we are nowhere near the caliber of players as both of you are. Qatspy, realizing the nature of the game of golf, replied, “Golf is a game that one can never master, but can humble any player who slightly looks ahead. The player who takes themselves seriously is at the mercy of the course.”

 

 

Gaston and Qatspy, pointing to the tenth tee box, suggested that two French officers, Bellamy and Quentrell, have the honors. Lt. Col. Quentrell, stepping up first, drove his tee shot into the right rough, as did Col. Bellamy. Both remarked that they couldn’t overcome the tendency of over-fading their long irons and driver. Col. Bellamy, not showing any frustration, remarked to Qatspy and Gaston, “I wish I knew what I was doing to correct my fading the ball.” Qatspy and Gaston both drove the tee shots down the right hand of the fairway, leaving them with a 150-meter approach to the Green.

 

 

Lt. Col. Quentrell commented on both Qatspy and Gaston’s tee shots, “I would like to know the secret to hitting fairways on a consistent basis.” Qatspy, looking back toward the ninth green and then to the clubhouse, saw that no one was behind them. Qatspy, stepping back to the right side of the tee box, asked Lt. Col. Quentrell and Col. Bellamy to take a mulligan on the tenth.

 

 

Qatspy asked if both Lt. Col. Quentrell and Col. Bellamy could try a preset technique that could help them square up their club face at impact. Col. Bellamy and Quentrell both replied, “S’il vous plaît, we would be very interested in your preset technique.” Qatspy demonstrated and described the Sync and Preset technique on the tenth tee box to the two officers. Qatspy, while demonstrating the technique, explained how the golfer must have a word describing each of the two preset elements during the golf swing as a word association.

 

 

Col. Bellamy, with a very serious and passionate expression, asked Qatspy, “What do you mean by a Word Association for each element?” Qatspy replied with an understanding candor, “A word association is a technique to link or connect the mind and body and to avoid thinking. Like in my case, my words association is SPY for Sync, Preset, and Yaw. This movements are like how a baseball batter would swing a bat or how a tennis player would swing a tennis racket, and this is by cocking their wrists.” Col. Bellamy, in the attempt to understand the term ‘baseball,’ asked Qatspy, “Like your Yanks’ sport of baseball, like Babe Ruth?” Qatspy reply, “Exactly, how a batter would swing a bat while standing in the batter’s box.”

 

 

Col. Bellamy asked Qatspy, “Can you demonstrate this baseball swing technique?” First, Qatspy explained, “I must make a distinction between the golfer’s wrist and their lower forearm. Most golfers, in the attempt to preset their wrist, actually end up presetting their lower forearm, or wristbands, like on a pair of boxing gloves.

 

The wristband represents the lower forearms and not the wrists. The wrists are actually below the wristband on a pair of boxing gloves. The objective of the Sync and Preset Technique for a right-hander is to pair up the left Hypothenar with the right elbow. This is naturally followed by the left Pinky Knuckle cocking and locking the wrists onto the swing plane by pointing toward the right big toe naturally. The clinical names for the hinging and cocking techniques is the Palmar-Dorsiflex Pronation of the golfer’s wrist.

 

   

 

Qatspy pulled out his scorecard book from his rear pocket and unfolded an old faded piece of paper showing the boxing gloves and the wrists in the Lock Position. Qatspy explained how the left Hypothenar pivots about the left Palmaris Longus ligament, followed by the cocking maneuver of left wrist about the left Pinky Knuckle.

 

There is a noticeable ligament that most people can see called the Palmaris Longus on the medial side of their wrists. Beside this ligament is a muscle called the Hypothenar. This is where the golfer wants to flex their left wrist up toward their right elbow before naturally cocking their wrists. There are only two muscles, called Thenars in the wrists and these two muscles are the only two muscles that have direct connect with the handle of the golf club. The Palmaris Longus ligament is an important link between the golfer’s wrist, forearm, and elbow. This ligament synchronizes the entire golf swing.

 

 

As Qatspy explained and demonstrated, both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell nodded, indicating they understood the concept of the Sync being a Palmar-Dorsiflex maneuver and the Preset being a Pronation with the left wrist. Qatspy finally described the setup and execution of the Sync, Preset, and Yaw golf swing technique. Qatspy also mentioned during his demonstration that for the right-handed golfer, the left side drives while the right side rides. So for the right-handed golfer, their right side responds to the left side.

 

Qatspy asked both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell if they've seen a home plate in baseball.

 

Qatspy asked both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell if they’ve seen a home plate in baseball. Both replied, “Oui.” Qatspy explained, “The back corner of home plate is where the Sync maneuver is completed and where the Preset naturally takes place, with a firm and quick maneuver to Preset the wrists. You’re not just setting and locking the wrists, but also setting and locking the right elbow toward your rib cage. This synchronizes and locks the right elbow with the powerful shoulders. This is why the Preset maneuver has to be quick and firm. From the lock position of the wrists and right elbow, you just take the handle of the club up to the top of your golf swing with the left knuckles.”

 

 

Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell both practiced the Sync and Preset technique, while Qatspy showed how the wrist are properly locked onto the correct swing plane and the left Pinky Knuckle for the right-hander should point toward the right big toe. Qatspy asked if Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell felt their right elbow lock toward or against their rib cage. They both replied, “Oui.”

 

 

Qatspy continued The ESPY Golf Swing Technique demonstrating the downswing, “The downswing is simply aiming the left knuckles toward the back corner of home plate and in the attempt to break the pane of glass on the front part of home plate with your left knuckles. This creates the lag for power and clubhead speed at impact that is critical. But the key of your focus is the two points on home plate, so don’t even focus on the golf ball.” Focusing on the ball will cause you to hit to the golf ball instead of hitting through the golf ball.

 

 

On the tenth tee box, both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell ran through about five dry runs of what Qatspy called The ESPY Golf Swing to get the feel for the Sync, Preset, and Yaw maneuvers. While they finished their practice swings, Qatspy stressed the importance of the Home Plate Drill to Sync and Preset their wrists and continued to make these maneuvers below the left boxing glove wristband.

 

 

While Qatspy was demonstrating the Sync and Preset technique, Both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell continued experimenting with the SPY technique. Qatspy explained, “This should naturally supinate the right forearm, based on how the boxing gloves are orientated on the handle of the golf club. Col Bellamy, being right-handed, commented, “I feel my right elbow lock against my right side my left Pinky Knuckle point toward my right big toe.”

 

 

Qatspy concluded his ESPY golf swing demonstration with three checkpoints. This included him presetting the wrists into the Locking Position, his left Pinky Knuckle pointing toward the back corner of home plate, and the left knuckles breaking pane of glass on the front part of home plate.

 

Qatspy concluded his ESPY golf swing demonstration with three checkpoints. This included presetting their wrists into the Locking Position, the back corner of home plate, and the front part of home plate of wallpaper.

 

As Lt. Col. Quentrell was placing his tee in the ground with his golf ball, Col. Bellamy asked Qatspy, “How did you come up with the baseball swing model, home plate, and boxing glove technique in your golf swing? Qatspy replied, “My grandfather believed that the baseball swing and golf swing were more similar than they were different. The home plate, batter’s box, and a pair of boxing gloves were great coaching tools to show how the golf swing should be set up to train the subconscious mind.”

 

 

Qatspy continued explaining, “The golfer may very well practice their golf swing using their conscious mind, but I can guarantee the golfer once they step foot on the golf course they will play golf using their subconscious mind, without a doubt.”

 

 

This time, much to the amazement of both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell, Lt. Col. Quentrell’s tee shot carried for about 250 meters, just to the left of center. Lt. Col. Quentrell, picking up his tee, could not believe the tee shot he just made. Lt. Col. Quentrell commented, “Not only did I straighten out my tee shot, but I hit a draw, and a draw has never happened before in my golf game.”

 

 

Col. Bellamy asked Qatspy, “What is this batter’s box technique?” Qatspy explained- Beside home plate there are two boxes on either side of home  plate where either a right or left handed-batter steps into when they are up to bat, like in your sport of Cricket. In golf, imagine there is a batter’s box on the side you are setting up to the golf ball. Once you step into your box everything is natural and instinctive routine, no thinking,  just like walking. When you are on a march you aren’t conscious about marching, it is natural, your just focused on your designation. Same in your golf swing. Anytime you start thinking about your golf swing something is wrong and not natural.

 

This time, much to the amazement of both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell, Lt. Col. Quentrell’s tee shot carried for about 250 meters, just to the left of center. Lt. Col. Quentrell, picking up his tee, could not believe the tee shot he just made. Lt. Col. Quentrell commented, “Not only did I straighten out my tee shot, but I hit a draw, and a draw has never been a part of my game before.”

 

Col. Bellamy drove his tee shot 242 meters and straight down the middle of the fairway. Both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell stood motionless in disbelief on the tenth tee ground, as Gaston and Qatspy picked up their bags and headed down the tenth fairway. Qatspy glanced back briefly and commented, “Are you gentlemen going to join us for the for the rest of the back nine or call it a day?”

 

 

After Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell gathered their composure, picked up their golf bag and Lt. Col. Quentrell asked Qatspy, “How are we going to score that mulligan?” Qatspy answered, looking ahead, “You’re not; Don’t you remember, we disturbed you on the tee ground walking up behind you with all that crowd and commotion.” Both Col. Bellamy and Lt. Col. Quentrell double timed it and caught up with Qatspy and Gaston, as Qatspy looked to Gaston and winked as to signal this is going to be a fun summer in France.

 

Except from “Operation Cobra” a book that will be E-Published in June of 2019 by Charles Wendell Boatright